PM Nawaz Speech at UNGA
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Moeed Pirzada |

PM Nawaz Speech at UNGA was not bad. If anything it was a good balanced speech. Off course it was not written by Nawaz; he would not even grasp some of the concepts or terms -or their real importance – mentioned in the speech. But such speeches are always written by Foreign Policy Experts and in Tariq Fatemi, NS has an excellent Adviser with a balanced world view and we assume it must have been written by Fatemi. But Nawaz Sharif had to approve the gist and the substance and in times of political crisis like these Nawaz had no option but to go with this script and he read it well. He did not misspell, he did not fumble, he did not look out of touch. Since it was a written script and he merely read it out, and in any case, he is not a very good speaker for such international situations but then in Pakistan who are we comparing to whom? Nawaz read it better than Zardari. He is no Oxbridge or Harvard type but from normal South Asian standards, it was fine. (It was better than his performance in front of the PMLN workers in Astoria Waldorf with Ptv camera introducing them as Pak-American community; who was actually waiting for him outside UN).

Govt will find it difficult to govern and will soon start to lose out the support of international stakeholders. The inability – or lack of desire or interest or not finding time – on part of President Obama to meet him on the sidelines of UNGA is a pointer in that direction.

But speeches are not only about “written scripts” and reading them out. Good speakers – even when speeches are written for them – identify with the substance, mark their stresses and pauses for they believe in what they are saying. For Public leaders of the stature of Prime Ministers, it is far more important because you have to bring out a soul of a nation through your words and gestures. From that point of view, this speech was lacking in spirit and mental synchronization with words.

Read more: How Would Have Sushma Swaraj Taken Her Position At UNGA Without “Uri Attack”?

Politically speaking, Nawaz’s problems are not increased by this speech – but they are not resolved either. His opponents were banking upon that he will miss out some essentials – say about Kashmir – to please the US or India but it was never possible at this stage. So it was a safe speech, damage control kind of speech, which does not give out much room for lashing at him – unless you just want to lash out at him. (And firing of Hatf-IX and his Military Chief visiting LOC few hours earlier did not give him much room either).

Politically speaking, Nawaz’s problems are not increased by this speech – but they are not resolved either. His opponents were banking upon that he will miss out some essentials – say about Kashmir – to please the US or India but it was never possible at this stage. So it was a safe speech

However PM Nawaz Sharif’s problems are very deep; he faces a serious political challenge which he and his close associates have continuously dealt, by design and intention, as a law and order or administrative problem and are still wishing that it will peter out due to sheer exhaustion of his opponents on logistic issues. (money, costs, lack of support from Army, depression due to lack of results etc) Unfortunately for Nawaz & Associates, It is not. If anything the political bug is spreading; the robust demonstration by hundreds of Pakistanis in New York only proves that; with every set back his opponents take stock and are improvising; now no one has any control on these action-reaction political dynamics; the best solution for PM Nawaz is to engage his political opponents in a meaningful way across a table and make genuine concessions; the first and foremost being “Election Audit” followed by new Election Commission and an Early Election under new mutually agreed rules and regulations by early 2015 or late 2015. And planners and killers of Model Town massacre have to be punished. Every other trick will fail. Govt will find it difficult to govern and will soon start to lose out the support of international stakeholders. The inability – or lack of desire or interest or not finding time – on part of President Obama to meet him on the sidelines of UNGA is a pointer in that direction.

 

Moeed Pirzada is prominent TV Anchor & commentator; he studied international relations at Columbia Univ, New York and law at London School of Economics. Twitter: MoeedNj. The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Global Village Space’s editorial policy. This piece was first published in Moeed Pirzada’s official page. It has been reproduced with permission.

Moeed Hasan Pirzada is a Pakistani political commentator, geostrategic analyst, and a television news journalist. He is an anchor at Dunya News and hosts TV programs. He has interviewed many politicians around the world. Moeed Hassan Pirzada has also been a Director World Affairs and Content Head of PTV News and hosted the famous talk show Sochta Pakistan, a program that discussed national, regional, strategic, social and educational issues with politicians, analysts and policy makers. He has worked with Dunya News-TV channel as a Director World Affairs and hosted the current affairs talk show Dunya Today. He has written for Dubai-based regional paper Khaleej Times. His columns have appeared in major Pakistani papers such as Dawn, The News International, Daily Times, Friday Times and blogs. He has attended national and international conferences, seminars and policy workshops and had been a member of the Prime Minister's Education Task Force that collaborated with the British Council to produce the Next Generation Report. He has contributed policy papers to Islamabad Policy Research Institute (IPRI) and also written several policy pieces for Pique Magazine. He is an Executive Director of Governance & Policy Advisors (GAPA) that provides consultancy services to the government institutions, development organizations and corporate bodies on issues related to media, governance, health policy, and regional peace.

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