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Thursday, July 18, 2024

Corruption Crisis: Amnesty’s Alarming Findings in Pakistan

The report indicated that the police department exhibited the highest levels of corruption, showing a five percent increase from the previous year.

On Friday, Amnesty International Pakistan unveiled its National Corruption Impact Assessment Report, revealing disturbing findings about the widespread corruption across various sectors in the nation.

The report indicated that the police department exhibited the highest levels of corruption, showing a five percent increase from the previous year. Notably, the Sindh Police played a significant role in driving this surge, with the Judiciary Department ranking third in terms of corruption.

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Amnesty International Pakistan conducted a survey involving 2,023 participants to gauge opinions on corruption within different departments. The results pointed to the police department being perceived as the most corrupt, with a corruption rate of 30 percent. Following closely were tendering and contracting at 16 percent, and the Judiciary Department at third place with 13 percent.

The report brought attention to alarming corruption rates within specific police forces. Sindh and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa police were identified as the most corrupt at 37 percent, while Punjab police stood at 25 percent. Meanwhile, Balochistan, while not leading in police corruption, reported a significant 20 percent corruption rate, with tendering and contracting at 31 percent ranking as the most corrupt institution in the province.

Although a marginal decrease in corruption was observed in the education sector, there was a two percent increase in the health department. Unfortunately, a majority (67%) expressed disillusionment with anti-corruption institutions like NAB and FIA, viewing them as instruments for political vendettas.

The report’s findings outlined sector-specific fluctuations in corruption levels, indicating increases in police, health, and local government corruption. Conversely, there were reductions in corruption within the judiciary, tendering, customs, and excise income tax departments.

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Regarding the causes of corruption, 40 percent attributed it to the absence of merit in institutions, while 55 percent advocated for transparent disclosure of public officials’ assets and income sources. Additionally, the report highlighted a concerning belief held by 47 percent: without accountability, stability becomes unattainable, potentially perpetuating a cycle of negative impressions and societal unease.

Alarmingly, 62 percent of respondents connected corruption to heightened environmental risks in Pakistan, emphasizing the far-reaching implications of this pervasive issue.