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Country faces electricity shortfall?

The electricity shortfall in Pakistan has reached 5300 MW as the country is producing 20,757 MW against 26,000 MW demand.

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As people across the country face continuous power outages, it is being reported that the country is faced with an electricity shortfall. The electricity shortfall in Pakistan has reached 5300 MW as the country is producing 20,757 MW against 26,000 MW demand.

According to sources privy to the matter, the current gas shortage in the country is being blamed for the current electricity shortfall in the country. Abid Sher Ali, former Minister of Power and PMLN leader, blamed the PTI government for the current electricity crisis.

He underscored that the former government of PML-N had added approximately 12,000 extra electricity to the national grid; however, the crisis had resurfaced because of the incompetence of the PTI-led government. He maintained that the PTI government’s non-purchase of oil and gas was the sole reason for the current 5,000 MW shortfall.

As a result of the electricity shortfall, some part of the country is experiencing more than 10 hours of power outages. Commenting on the electricity crisis Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif took a similar tone to Abid Sher Ali and blamed the former Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf-led government for the current situation. He said, “The PTI government neither purchased fuel on time nor repaired power plants, hence the current load-shedding.”

Read more: CPPA recommends an increase of Rs 3.15 per unit electricity

Separately on May 11, the Ministry of Energy categorically rejected the claim that the country is facing an electricity shortfall of 5600 megawatts. It added, “There is no truth to the false claims of generation capacity of 20000 MW.”

It is pertinent to mention that a Singapore-based commodity trading company Gunvor sent out refusal notices to Pakistan ahead of the expected delivery of LNG cargoes to the country. The Energy Ministry received the letter on March 26, and it stated that the commodity trading company would not be able to ship four LNG cargoes that, as per contracts, were scheduled for delivery on April 15, May 14, June 4 and June 9. The move forced the Pakistani government to purchase LNG on the spot market.

Read more: Chinese companies warn of shutting down power plants in Pakistan