Print Friendly, PDF & Email

M.G. Vaidya (‘The price of personal law, IE, November 1) makes chilling reading. It is not easy to believe that in a democracy, someone could seriously argue a case for disenfranchisement of citizens. But that is exactly what Vaidya’s suggestion to the Law Commission does. It is unlikely that Vaidya would not know or remember the opposition by many Hindu (and Hindutva) organisations to the reform of Hindu laws in the 1950s. So, we do not know if he would disenfranchise those opponents retrospectively. But it is clear that his variant of the argument is oblivious to nuance. So, he would not be interested in questions such as those that some feminists raise over “uniformity” and application of Hindu reforms to all communities. Nor will he find merit in the argument that the problem of triple talaq could be separated from the larger task of bringing all personal laws under a uniform umbrella.

To read full article click on this link: The Indian Express

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Global Village Space’s editorial policy.

Comments & Discussion