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Honda Civic 2022 vs. Toyota Corolla 2021, a spec comparison

Honda has launched the all-new 11th generation Civic. The Toyota Corolla is a global juggernaut. Both compact cars are standard-bearers in the sedan segment. Let's see who does better!

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When a group of friends discusses sedans available in the market, there is a high chance that it is not Mercedes vs. BMW but rather Toyota Corolla vs. Honda Civic.

In the automobile market for a long time, both cars have gone hand in hand. As the Civic 2022 has recently been released, let’s see how the latest models of both cars stack against each other.

Engine

We only know of two powertrains for the 2022 Honda Civic at the time of this writing: a 158-hp 2.0-liter I-4 and a 180-hp turbocharged 1.5-liter four-pot. Both carry over from the prior generation Civic, although the turbo engine benefits from six extra horses in its stable.

When it comes to sheer power, the Civic’s engines top those of the Corolla, which comes standard with a 139-hp 1.8-liter four-cylinder and is available with a larger 169-hp 2.0-liter I-4.

On the other hand, Corolla’s available gearbox choices, however, give it a slight edge over the new Civic. Whereas Honda fits its sedan with a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT), regardless of engine choice, Toyota offers the 2021 Corolla with a six-speed manual transmission on certain 2.0-liter-equipped models.

Read More: Honda reveals ‘much matured’ 11th gen Civic 2022

Although run-of-the-mill Civic sedans may no longer offer a clutch pedal, the forthcoming Civic Si sedan ought to maintain the feature and may reportedly offer more than 200 hp from its engine, too.

Dimensions

With 107.7 inches of space between its wheel centers, the 2022 Civic sees its wheelbase grow by 1.4 inches relative to its predecessor.

That is also the difference in length between the 2022 Civic’s wheelbase and 2021 Corolla’s, with Civic’s length greater.

Obviously, Honda complements the Civic’s bigger wheelbase with additional exterior length, and at 184.0 inches long the latest Civic both overshadows its old self and the 2021 Corolla by 1.3 and 1.7 inches, respectively.

The Civic’s larger length directly affects its insides, too, making up for up to 99.0 cubic feet of passenger space and 14.8 cubic feet of trunk space, 10.4 and 1.7 cubes more than the Corolla, respectively.

Infotainment

Both the 2022 Civic and 2021 Corolla sedans come standard with 7.0-inch touchscreen infotainment systems.

Whereas the 2022 Civic’s available 9.0-inch unit tops that of the 2021 Corolla’s optional 8.0-inches touchscreen, the Honda sedan limits its big infotainment screen to the top Touring trim. The Corolla, meanwhile, features the 8.0-inch screen as standard on all but the base L trim.

It is worth mentioning that Civic top Touring trim is the highest in line among the Civic options.

Read More: Toyota is finally launching its Corolla Cross SUV in Pakistan

The Civic makes a bigger impact with its standard 7.0-inch gauge cluster screen that tops the tiny 4.2-inch unit in the Corolla. Those looking for an even more immersive digital gauge cluster experience can nab the top-line Civic Touring, which comes with a big 10.2-inch setup.

Similarly, the high-end Corolla XLE and XSE trim come standard with a 7.0-inch digital display.

Styling

It seems like a largely handsome design, especially when compared next to the alien-like origami angles of the outgoing Civic, and it appears more like a scaled-down interpretation of the latest big Accord than a sleeker version of the prior generation.

The current civic remains one of the best compact cars in any body style or trim when driving, and according to Honda, the bones are retained from the outgoing car, with significant improvements in torsional rigidity and handling. This means one can expect the car to be quite good at driving.

According to the motor illustrated blog, Toyota has long been faulted for its bland, or “beige”, designs. Those days are long gone. In fact, few manufacturers dare to be so bold, with the possible exception of Hyundai.

Toyota’s “S” and “L” trim strategy enables them to deliver slightly more subdued versions and more aggressive design features under the same family of products. Some aspects, such as the current grille, may not be to everyone’s taste however the “old” Corolla sure isn’t visually boring anymore.

Toyota’s “S” and “L” trim strategy enables them to deliver slightly more subdued versions and more aggressive design features under the same family of products. Some aspects, such as the current grille, may not be to everyone’s taste however the “old” Corolla sure isn’t visually boring anymore.

Strangely, it’s now the 2022 Honda Civic that is toned down. The previous-generation Civic was far louder visually – the new car marks a return to Honda’s more conservative design roots. The cleaner lines are more premium, with hints stemming from the current Accord and the new Acura TLX. The taillights however look to be heavily inspired by a certain German competitor.

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