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Mountaineer Ali Sadpara’s body presumably found on K2.

Bodies found on K2 are reported to be of Pakistan’s hero mountaineer Ali Sadpara and Iceland’s John Snorri. Sadpara’s son Sajid had set on an expedition last month to recover the bodies and make a documentary on their lives.

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Two bodies have been found near K2 base camp 4 and according to sources they may belong to Ali Sadpara and Iceland’s John Snorri.

The two bodies were found below 300m from the bottleneck on K2 Mountains. The bodies were at a great distance from each other and are being identified. Officials are yet to confirm the news.

Pakistan’s climbing heroes, Ali Sadpara, John Snorri from Iceland, and Juan Pablo Mohr from Chile had gone missing on K2, the world’s second-highest mountain while attempting to scale K2 in winters. On February 18, nearly two weeks after they went missing on the ‘Savage Mountain’, the three were officially declared dead.

Ali Sadpara’s son Sajid Sadpara, who was accompanying the three, had to withdraw after his oxygen regulator malfunctioned and he returned to Camp 3. He was the only survivor from their group.

On June 24, Sajid went to summit the mountain again in order to find his father’s dead body and to make a documentary on it. “I want to go to K2 to know what happened to my father and John Snorri,” said Sajid in a press conference as he announced his plans to start climbing the world’s second-tallest mountain.

“A documentary on the life of Jon Snorri and Ali Sadpara is in the making. [I hope] go to K2 to search [the dead body] and make a documentary,” said Sajid, adding that it may take him and his team 40 to 45 days to summit the peak.

Ali Sadpara hails from a small village in Skardu, Gilgit-Baltistan. Lacking better training opportunities, Ali Sadpara began his hobby of mountaineering as a porter and traveled with certified mountaineering teams but only went as far as the last base camp with their luggage and returned.

After that, he started his journey and climbed many famous peaks. In 2019, he climbed the world’s fifth-highest peak at 8,485 meters in Nepal. He is the first Pakistani mountaineer to have climbed seven mountain peaks above 8,000 meters in the world.

Read More: Sirbaz, Joshi dedicate Annapurna peak climb to Ali Sadpara

In other news

According to the Scottish expedition team, another mountaineer Rick Allen has also passed away while attempting to summit K2. The Scottish climber died in an avalanche on K2 as he attempted to take a new route to the summit.

Allen was climbing the mountain to raise funds for the Partners Relief and Development charity.

His two partners, Jordi Tosas from Spain and Stephan Keck from Austria have reportedly been rescued by a Pakistan Army chopper without sustaining any serious injuries unfortunately Allen could not make the journey back.

In an official statement given on the charity’s Facebook page read “it is with great sadness to announce that Rick Allen has died whilst attempting a new route on K2, the world’s second-highest mountain. Rick died doing what he loved the most and lived his life with the courage of his convictions”.

Rick was a trustee of Partners UK, which is currently focused on meeting the acute health and educational needs of refugee children displaced from their homes in Myanmar by recent political upheavals. The fundraising effort has received as much as £1,200.

Following the news, Pakistan’s first woman to climb Mt.Everest and First Pakistani & First Muslim woman to climb 7 summits on 7 continents, Samina Baig has called off her Summit push and expedition to K2. In her tweets, she talked about the current situation and the events that took place which led her to make this difficult decision, even though the summit was her dream.

 

 

 

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