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Saturday, May 18, 2024

National football team of Morocco donates blood for earthquake victims

Amal Duraid, the director of the Regional Center for Blood Transfusion in Casablanca, issued an urgent appeal for blood donations to assist those injured in the earthquake.

The national football team of Morocco donates blood to show solidarity with the victims of a devastating earthquake. The Moroccan national team, through their official social media account, shared images of the players donating blood to support the earthquake survivors.

Amal Duraid, the director of the Regional Center for Blood Transfusion in Casablanca, issued an urgent appeal for blood donations to assist those injured in the earthquake. She called upon citizens throughout Morocco to visit their nearest blood donation centers, emphasizing the increasing death toll from the earthquake.

Reportedly, numerous citizens in various cities, including Marrakesh and Rabat, responded to the call and volunteered to donate blood.

The earthquake, with a magnitude of 7.0, had tragic consequences, resulting in the loss of at least 1,037 lives and causing injuries to 1,204 individuals. The fatalities were reported in different regions, encompassing Al Haouz and Marrakesh provinces, as well as the cities of Ouarzazate, Azilal, Chichaoua, and Taroudant, as stated by Morocco’s Interior Ministry.

The earthquake has left not only a devastating human toll but has also caused significant damage to some of the country’s most cherished historic sites, including the historic city of Marrkech, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Read more: Historic Koutoubia Mosque severely damaged in Morocco earthquake

Among the affected landmarks, the Tinmel Mosque, a renowned historical site, suffered substantial damage. Images circulating on social media show a broken wall and large piles of debris at this earth-and-stone mosque located in the High Atlas mountains.

The Tinmel Mosque holds great historical significance, as it was founded in 1147 by the Almohad caliph Abd al-Mu’min right after he conquered Marrakesh from the Almoravids. A second version of the mosque, rebuilt around 1158 and likely completed by Ya’qub al-Mansur around 1195, stands today.
This mosque is considered a classic example of Almohad architecture and Moroccan mosque design. The prominent minaret tower, soaring to a height of 77 meters (253 feet), is adorned with intricate geometric arch motifs and crowned with a spire and metal orbs. It is not only a symbol of historical significance but also an important landmark in Marrakesh.