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Thursday, May 23, 2024

Nita Ambani reportedly wears Mughal jewellery worth Rs 200 crore

She adorned the piece while attending the recently concluded Miss World event. Nita Ambani matched this priceless piece of antique jewellery with a black banarasi saree.

Wife of Indian business giant, Nita Ambani reportedly wore Mughal jewellery, Baazubandh worth INR 200 Crore. The exquisite piece of ornament belonged to Emperor Shah Jehan.

She adorned the piece while attending the recently concluded Miss World event. Nita Ambani matched this priceless piece of antique jewellery with a black banarasi saree.She adorned the piece while attending the recently concluded Miss World event. Nita Ambani matched this priceless piece of antique jewellery with a black banarasi saree.

The said piece of jewellery features ruby and diamond sarpech (turban ornament) into baajubandh.

Numerous Indian news platforms relied on the insights shared by Pramod Kumar KG, the Managing Director of a museum consulting firm based in Delhi. He took to his Instagram profile to showcase the historical significance and intricate craftsmanship of the artifact.

In his post on Topophilia India, he penned, “Shah Jahan, son of Jahangir Shah, proudly proclaim the pair of inscribed spinels highlighting this sarpech (turban ornament); last seen publicly at the Al Thani Collection before being divested at auction in 2019.”

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The post went on to read, “At a height of 13.7 cm and 19.8 cm wide, the piece is made of gold and set with diamonds, rubies, and spinels, using the Pachhikakaam technique adopted by Indian jewellers attempting to mimic European claw setting. The lowest register of 12 suspended diamonds is set in the Western style. The true versatility of Indian jewels however comes from its adaptability into myriad forms and contexts. A sarpech repurposed as a bazuband or armband is still as magnificent. Besides being back in India, what’s great is that it is back to adorn the human form and away from a glass vitrine. The Mughal artifact, now repurposed as a bazuband, boasts inscribed spinels with Shah Jahan’s proclamation, adding historical significance to its staggering value.”

The sarpech showcased, likely crafted in the late 19th century, features two inscribed spinels dating back to the 17th century, possibly added to the piece in the 19th century. This raises curiosity about the origin of such unique jewels in Indian princely states.