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Tuesday, May 21, 2024

North & South Korea agree “in principle” to end war

The Korean War was fought from 1950-1953 between North Korea, supported by China and the Soviet Union, and South Korea, supported by several countries including the US, UK and Turkey.

The US, China and North Korea have agreed “in principle” to officially end the Korean War, South Korea’s president said Monday.

South Korea will push for this accord to happen, said Moon Jae-in during a joint press conference with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison following bilateral summit talks in Canberra, South Korea’s official Yonhap news agency reported.

Moon added that officially ending the war would help stalled talks between South and North Korea and between North Korea and the US.

The Korean War was fought from 1950-1953 between North Korea, supported by China and the Soviet Union, and South Korea, supported by several countries including the US, UK and Turkey.

Read more: UK sanctions Lashkar-e-Jhangvi commander for crimes against humanity

The war started on June 25, 1950, when North Korea began invading South Korea along the border located on the 38th parallel, the line of latitude that crosses the peninsula they shared. It ended on July 27, 1953.

However, no peace accord has been signed between the two sides despite numerous attempts, and hence technically, the conflict continues.

US imposes sanctions

The human rights-related sanctions, joined in by Canada and the UK, marked Human Rights Day on Friday

The United States on Friday imposed sweeping human rights-related sanctions on dozens of people and entities tied to China, Myanmar, and North Korea.

Canada and the United Kingdom joined the US in imposing sanctions related to human rights abuses in Myanmar.

The beginning of new sanctions

Marking Human Rights Day on Friday, the sanctions against North Korea are the first under US President Joe Biden’s administration.

A Chinese artificial intelligence company SenseTime Group was also added to an investment blacklist for allegedly developing facial recognition programs to identify ethnic Uyghurs.

Read more: US House votes to clamp down on imports from China’s Xinjiang

Our actions today, particularly those in partnership with the United Kingdom and Canada, send a message that democracies around the world will act against those who abuse the power of the state to inflict suffering and repression,” Deputy Treasury Secretary Wally Adeyemo said.

Anadolu with additional input by GVS News Desk