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NZ pays PCB compensation for abruptly ending last year’s tour

The compensation amount has not been disclosed, but it includes financial loss because of hotel bookings, security, marketing, broadcast, etc.

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New Zealand Cricket (NZC) has paid compensation to the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) for abruptly ending the tour last year in September 2021.

The compensation amount has not been disclosed. However, as per sources, PCB will make huge profits from New Zealand’s next year’s tour to Pakistan.

Meanwhile, New Zealand invited Pakistan Cricket Board on Tuesday to play the T20 tri-nation series in Christchurch in October before the T20 World Cup in Australia, as reported by Geo news.

The relationships between both the boards have returned to normal, with PCB making up its mind to accept the invitation.

According to sources, the T20 tri-nation series, held from October 16 to November 13, includes Pakistan and Bangladesh alongside New Zealand.

PCB will confirm the tour to New Zealand after deciding the dates with England as they are scheduled to travel to Pakistan for seven T20Is planned in October.

PCB Chairman Ramiz Raja announced that they would ask New Zealand to pay compensation after the black caps, just before the first ODI in Rawalpindi on September 17, 2021, opted to return home, citing security concerns.

Even the phone call of then Prime Minister Imran Khan to counterpart Jacinda Ardern could not stop New Zealand, so after 18 years, the fans’ wish to see the New Zealand team play in Pakistan again remained unfulfilled.

Read more: No security threat in Pakistan: PM Khan assures New Zealand

Later, England also withdrew from sending their men and women teams to Pakistan.

Zealand compensation includes financial loss, including hotel bookings, security, marketing, broadcast, etc.

New Zealand will tour Pakistan in December 2022/January 2023 for three ODIs and two Tests, while they will make up for the canceled tour in April 2023, where they will play five T20Is and as many ODIs.