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Pakistan needs trained youth at the frontlines of hybrid warfare: Dr Moeed

NSA Moeed Yusuf said the lawfare was a long-term capacity that needed to be produced in the system. Pakistan’s future policy would be based on economic diplomacy, cybersecurity, and public lawfare.

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National Security Advisor (NSA) Dr. Moeed Yusuf Wednesday said Pakistan was facing the grave threat of hybrid warfare and needs to train young professionals to neutralize all the negativity against it on different online platforms.

The government had successfully executed several development projects that needed effective projection through media, he said while addressing a seminar titled “Lawfare Doctrine for Pakistan”, organized here by the Centre for Law and Security (CALS).

Dr. Moeed highlighted the important role of universities and colleges in producing a skilled human resource in that field so that it could meet the state’s demand when arose.

“If I say that the challenge of hybrid warfare would over soon, it is crazy on my part,” he said while describing ‘lawfare’ as an additional part that needed due attention for effectively neutralizing this threat.

Read more: India’s Hybrid Warfare Against Pakistan: Challenges and Response

He said the lawfare was a long-term capacity that needed to be produced in the system. Pakistan’s future policy would be based on economic diplomacy, cybersecurity, and public lawfare.

He stressed the need to produce 1500-2000 professionals, who should be well-versed in the field; otherwise, the country would lag in human resource development.

He said in the past, there was a reliance on foreign lawyers as far as different components of the lawfare were concerned such as thinking, litigation, and intellect. “What else you should do if you do not develop your capacity,” he added.

He said there was a lot of effort being made to coordinate the system as regards the lawfare. When there was a new phenomenon, it obviously lacked a mechanism for coordinating its system.

“Because this (lawfare) is a new field, not everybody is clear how they link up lawfare,” he added.

However, he said there was a need to coordinate the system of lawfare in one place. A lot of excellent people were doing the work and producing desired results.

Moeed said there were multiple links to the field, including provincial governments, Foreign Office, National Security Office, and others. “How all of this will come together, this is a critical question, and we have done a lot of work on it and we are moving forward,” he added.

He stressed that the education system had to take responsibility and develop human resources in that regard.

Read more: EXPLAINER: What is hybrid warfare?

In the recent past, the NSA pointed out that there were litigations and arbitrations, which remained highly successful but were not projected by some elements as they talked of negatives.

Courtesy: APP

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