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Pakistani-American doctor implants a pig’s heart in a US patient

Dr. Mansoor Mohiuddin hails from Karachi and is a graduate of the Dow University of Health Sciences. In his interview with a local media outlet, he said that his team researched about the genetic makeup of a pig's heart and learned to genetically modify it.

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American-Pakistani doctor, Dr. Mansoor Mohiuddin, has become the first doctor in the world to implant a pig’s heart in a patient. Dr. Mohiuddin performed the surgery along with a team of other doctors. Implanting the pig’s heart became inevitable after all the methods to save the life of a 57-year-old patient, David Bennet.

David Bennet has also become the first person in the world to undergo a genetically-modified pig-heart transplant. The long-term chance of survival is still not known.

Dr. Mansoor Mohiuddin hails from Karachi and is a graduate of the Dow University of Health Sciences. In his interview with a local media outlet, he said, “We researched about the genetic makeup of a pig’s heart and learned to genetically modify it in any way through different genetic techniques.”

“Experiments have been done on a monkey’s heart for heart transplants for humans in the past, but they did not work out. However, the experiment on a pig’s heart did.”

“We examined all animals to find out which of them is closest to humans and found a pig suitable for the experiment,” he added.

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He explained that a pig grows very fast and the heart of a month-old pig’s heart is the size of a human heart. Regarding the cost of the transplant, he said that it is not a big deal since such medical procedures are insured in America and other countries.

“However, the main expenditure was made on genetically modifying a pig’s heart because it is a very lengthy procedure and we took genes from different pigs to do the job so it cost around $500,000,” he said.

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A day before the surgery patient, Bennet said to BBC that “it was either die or do this transplant.” “I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice,” he said.

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