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Punjab considering ‘hybrid solar-wind’ energy projects: minister

Punjab Energy Minister Dr Akhtar malik has said that Punjab is looking to 'hybrid wind and solar' power projects to power the province

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Punjab’s Minister for Energy Dr. Akhtar Malik in a meeting yesterday, said that the Punjab government was considering a ‘hybrid’ solar and wind energy projects. He said that solar and wind energy is cheap and not hazardous to the environment.

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Pakistan possesses one of the best solar-energy potential geographies in the world. It receives relative to other countries a large amount of sunlight throughout the day. Renewable energy would be a cheaper alternative to fossil fuel-based energy that is detrimental to the environment and costs Pakistan greatly its foreign reserves, as the fuel has to be imported.

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A summary in this regard has been sent to the quarters concerned, he noted. Dr Akhtar also claimed that second phase of Quaid-i-Azam Solar project would be initiated soon.

Last week Energy Minister asked for action against artificial price inflaters

Last week Dr Akhtar has asked price control magistrates to take stringent action against artificial inflaters.

The Energy Minister for Punjab issued the order in a meeting last week with relevant officials. The implementation was part of CM Punjab Usman Buzdar’s initiative to crack down on artificial price inflation in Punjab.

Read more: CM Punjab insists police is being reformed: Reports contradict his stance

The energy minister expressed annoyance over artificial inflation and claimed that the government’s image was affecting due to inflation. He further said that strict action would be taken against anyone found involved in artificial inflation and hoarding.

GVS News Desk

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