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Saturday, January 28, 2023
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Revival of MQM

Through more inclusive local-level political initiatives and programmes that benefit all residents, regardless of their ethnicity or socioeconomic background, MQM also hopes to increase its appeal to other ethnic communities in Karachi.

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The political environment in Karachi is changing as a result of the resurrection of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM). Due to the MQM’s decision to regroup, the organisation is poised to make a strong comeback. The MQM leader’s infamous remarks in 2016 sparked riots in Karachi leading to the expulsion of the Altaf Hussain-led “London” group from politics. The other groups, which include the MQM-P, Farooq Sattar, Haqiqi, and Pak Sarzameen Party (PSP), are mostly irrelevant in electoral politics.

Altaf Hussain is apparently absent from the new scene. Kamran Tessori, the governor of Sindh and a recent lateral entrant into the MQM ranks, is in charge of this mission and has taken on the task of unifying the MQM and its leadership, which has been in disarray for a long time. Tessori said that he met with Mustafa Kamal and other PSP leaders in this regard and that the PSP has agreed to return under the original MQM fl ag and work with the Khalid Maqbool Siddiqui-led MQM-P.

It is anticipated that Mustafa Kamal will be in charge of the administration and Farooq Sattar will be in charge of politics. Organizational issues will be handled by Anis Qaimkhani, and the party leader will be Khalid Maqbool Siddiqui. The Rabta Committee, which has about 50 members right now, would also be slashed. The MQM wants to transform Karachi’s politics and challenge the PPP.

Read more: Farooq Sattar and Mustafa Kamal join MQM-P

In order to significantly influence the make-up of the federal government, it is aiming to win at least 50 seats in the Sindh Assembly and 15 seats in the National Assembly. Fawad Chaudhry has condemned the unification of MQM factions, calling it evidence of “goons” banding together in Karachi to undermine PTI support, while JI Karachi Amir Engr Hafiz Naeem ur Rehman has warned against the “Zardari-Tessori doctrine,” claiming it will fail in its attempt to “revive the politics of hatred.”

MQM’s bigger plans

Politics offer few guarantees, so we must wait and see if the merger actually happens. The 2017 absurd attempt to combine the PSP and MQM-P, allegedly at the request of the men in Rawalpindi, crumbled very dramatically a few hours after it was announced. Through more inclusive local-level political initiatives and programmes that benefit all residents, regardless of their ethnicity or socioeconomic background, MQM also hopes to increase its appeal to other ethnic communities in Karachi. Karachi is growing to be a multi-ethnic,
global city, and it would be wrong to confine the MQM to just one ethnic community as it once did.

Additionally, MQM is planning how to forge relationships with other political parties as well as religious and non-religious organisations. In addition to programmes to promote education and job training, this includes holding public forums to examine problems like poverty, injustice, and a lack of opportunity.

Read more: Disappointed MQM-P mulls quitting government

It is yet to be seen how the party can energise its employees and supporters and how it will use the money from its London real estate holdings to fund its campaign. It is, however, certain that the time of Altaf Hussain has ended and the MQM may have a role in the upcoming elections.