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Saudi Arabia reportedly removes ‘Only Muslims’ sign on road to Madinah

Saudi netizens have appreciated the new signboard which according to them shows the lessening of ultra-conservatism and rise in tolerance for non-Muslims in the kingdom.

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Saudi Arabia has removed the ‘Muslims Only’ signboard on the road leading to the Prophet’s Mosque Al-Madina Al-Munawwarah in Madinah, the second holiest site in Islam after Makkah.

Arab social media users shared the images of the removed signboard on social media. The shared images purport that the signboard had been changed to ‘Haram Area’ about the Madinah’s Haram or sacred site.

Saudi netizens have appreciated the new signboard which according to them shows the lessening of ultra-conservatism and rise in tolerance for non-Muslims in the kingdom. Others believe this will also increase tourism in Saudi Arabia as earlier, only Muslims were strictly allowed in the vicinity of the Holy mosque.

Read more: Saudi Arabia releases first-ever high resolution image of Hajr-e-Aswad

The report corresponds to the Vision 2030 of Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman to modernize and liberalize the ultra-conservative Saudi society.

Earlier, there were reports of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has introduced the Holy scripture of Hinduism, Ramayana, and Mahabharata, in the national school curriculum.

The development is part of the modernization plan Vision 2030 of Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman. According to the details, the objective is to offer students more knowledge about different cultures. Hence, students will be taught Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Yoga and Ayurveda, the globally significant Indian cultural practices will also be a part of the school curriculum as part of the exposure of students to other cultural practices. The English language has also become mandatory in schools under Vision 2030.

Read more: Saudi Arabia includes Ramayana, Mahabharata in school curriculum

A Saudi yogi, Nouf Almarwaai, posted the screenshots of the social studies exam undertaken by her son. The exam paper had questions about Hinduism, Buddhism, and Hindu epics of Ramayana and Mahabharata.

However, despite being widely reported in the media, various media organizations disputed the news claiming that there has been no mention of teaching the sacred scriptures of Hinduism in Saudi schools on the official website of the Saudi Vision 2030.

 

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