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Friday, March 24, 2023
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Saudi Arabia to fine pilgrims playing music, wearing shorts

Haramain Sharifain released an official statement on its official Twitter handle. The statement read that pilgrims, whether from inside or outside Saudi Arabia, will be charged with a heavy fine.

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Saudi Arabia has announced to fine pilgrims found wearing shorts or playing music during the call for prayer (Azaan) will be imposed with heavy fines.

Haramain Sharifain released an official statement on its official Twitter handle. The statement read that pilgrims, whether from inside or outside Saudi Arabia, will be charged with a heavy fine if found playing music during the call of prayer since it is unethical.

Another ruling was released on the dress code for the pilgrim entering the two Holy Grand Mosques to perform prayer.

“Anyone who is caught playing ‘music’ of any kind during the call of prayer from mosques will now be fined SAR 1000 (Rs46,730) for a first-time violation and if violation repeats SAR 2000 (Rs93,461) will be charged,” the Haramain Sharifain has said.

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“Individuals will be removed and fined SR 500 who enter Mosques including the Two Holy Mosques wearing shorts,” read another tweet.

Read more: Denmark convicts Iranian separatist group of spying for Saudi Arabia

Earlier, the Saudi government had released some new guidelines for the intending pilgrims. Pilgrims are expected to show their negative COVID-19 results taken 48 hours before entering the Grand Mosque in Makkah and Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah using the Tawakkalna app.

However, a few days ago, Saudi Arabia changed to the royal decree that governs its national anthem and green flag, which is inscribed with Islam’s proclamation of faith, identifying the country as the birthplace of the religion.

Late on Monday, the kingdom’s unelected consultative Shura Council voted in favor of changes, state-run media reported. It comes as the country’s young crown prince who emphasizes Saudi nationality and national pride.

While decisions by the council have no bearing on existing laws or structures, the vote is significant because its members are appointed by the king and their decisions often move in lockstep with leadership.

Other state-linked media reported that the changes favor amending the system governing the flag, the slogan, and the national anthem, but not its contents. The council has not disclosed further details.