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Shan Masood taken to hospital after head injury

Masood was conscious but was in deep pain. He has been taken to hospital for scans.

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Pakistani batter Shan Masood has been taken to hospital after suffering from head injury. He was hit by a ball on the right side of the head during the practice session.

Muhammad Nawaz had played the shot during the practice session that hit the head of batter Shan Masood. Masood was conscious but was in deep pain. He has been taken to hospital for scans. “Shan Masood is being taken to hospital for scans after a ball hit him in the right hand side of his head during Pakistan’s net session in MCG,” said the PCB in a statement.

Shan Masood is currently playing at number three in the Pakistan Cricket Team. The incident has happened two days before Pakistan has to start its T20 World Cup stint against India on Sunday, 23rd October.

A video circulating on claiming to be of Muhammad Nawaz shows the batter standing in the net is quite distraught and shocked. The batter sat on the ground while physios and doctors checked Shan Masood.

Cricket fans are wishing speedy recovery to Shan Masood on social media. They have expressed concerns regarding his health. They are eagerly waiting for positive news regarding his health.

Read more: Shaheen Shah Afridi’s lethal yorker injures Afghan’s Rahmanullah

Earlier, Pakistani pacer Shaheen Shah Afridi toe-crushing bowling to Afghan batter injured Rahmanullah Gurbaz in the warm-up. The video of his lethal Yorker made rounds on social media.

Afridi claimed the wicket in the first over of the innings but left the batter injured after the ball hit his toe. A deadly yorker from Shaheen Shah left Gurbaz unable to walk after he was hit on the left foot. The batter was in extreme pain. The incident happened on the fifth delivery of the first over. Physios were called into the field to check him; he was taken off the field by a substitute fielder later. Rahmanullah Gurbaz was immediately taken to the hospital for scans.