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Many said in interviews they wanted to stay to hold on to their homes, or to continue to resist the government of President Bashar al-Assad. Others say they would consider leaving if they did not fear new dangers along the journey, at the destination, or both. Yet staying means subjecting themselves to more of the airstrikes that have devastated the city — hitting hospitals, schools and apartment buildings, and killing hundreds in the last few weeks alone — since a brief cease-fire, negotiated by the United States and Russia, broke down in September.

“The regime threatens people to kill all of them if they decide to stay,” said Yasser al-Hmeish, an accountant for the area’s medical council. On Thursday, pro-government and rebel forces accused each other of preventing people from leaving Aleppo. The Syrian state news media said “terrorists” had attacked one of the crossing points, or humanitarian corridors, designated by Russia.

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