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Sunday, May 19, 2024

What is ahead for democracy in Pakistan?

Pakistan for the first time witnessed the transition of Government from one government to another. The successive government of Nawaz Sharif came across allegations in Panama papers, and resultantly Intraparty change occurred for the post. The chair then turned towards PTI, Imran Khan, who attract most of the critics made against his unrequired non-democratic motions.

Democracy is a widely respected and appealing form of government, practiced in more than 2/3 of the World’s recognized nation-states. Initially, given by A Greek poet, Solon in 507-508 BC with a democratic constitution, Democracy varied from time to time and compartmentalized itself differently with Respect to its transition in various parts of the world. Pakistan since its inception in 1947, came across the very same problem, as the non-democratic nature of unelected individuals did not suit the democratic ideals.

Somehow, it led to destabilizing the government through undemocratic means and resultantly overthrowing the government. A civil society that has been at the forefront of every restoring attempt for democracy has contributed much to all these attempts, however not regarded as the key agent in this process. Collins Hay, in his theory, The Strategic Relational Approach, discusses where he identifies these relations between the Agency and Structure.

Read more: Collective opinion important for stability of democracy: Justice Akhtar

Decades of democracy in Pakistan 

Pakistan is a third-world country, continuously under threat of non-democratic attempts to fold the democratic setup. A mature and lasting attempt was made in May 2006, by two ex- premiers of Pakistan, Benazir Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif to Restore democracy. This was named ad charter of Democracy which ensured the reinstall of Democracy in Pakistan after engaging civil society and the lawyer’s movement in combined efforts for democracy. The upcoming decade was somehow not welcoming with Respect to the wave of terrorism which caused severe damage.
However, Pakistan for the first time witnessed the transition of Government from one government to another. The successive government of Nawaz Sharif came across allegations in Panama papers, and resultantly Intraparty change occurred for the post. The chair then turned towards PTI, Imran Khan, who attract most of the critics made against his unrequired non-democratic motions. Surprisingly, as a student of the Politics and Individual part of civil society, I cannot realize the accepted space and position of Civil society in Pakistan. To me, a representative and the elected government will have the most part, be comprised of Civil society. It would reduce unnecessary political rifts and exempt the non-Democratic ideals.

Current Case of Democracy 

On 25 July 2018, PTI under its leader Imran Khan, took to the position of Prime minister in Pakistan. His contest was too much debated among the civil circles, however, doomed by his charisma and promises of change in the Economy and new Dawn for Pakistan. However, everything appeared contrary.
1) The PTI government continuously bypassed the parliament and Promulgated the Presidential ordinances.
2) Physical attempts on Journalists.
3) Institutional Crisis
4) Instability in Economic Ratios
5) Political Victimization
After the government folded the National Assembly on 3 April 2022, and a Supreme court restored it in its historic verdict on 7 April 2022. PTI seemed to be losing the Balance. Ministers compared to wage a new independence era against the opposition or any government taking their place. This seems very much an undemocratic and unnecessary attempt on the part of any Political participant.
The Supreme court verdict has been appealed to Democrats and they declared it the last Doctrine of necessity, however, I have termed it as A Doctrine of Constitutional necessity. It would mark an enormous in the upcoming history of Democracy in Pakistan.
The writer is a graduate of Politics and International Relations (SPIR), QAU, Islamabad. The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Global Village Space.