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Ivanka Trump is about to become the most influential first daughter since Alice Roosevelt Longworth. But can she do so without damaging her own brand?

When Nancy Pelosi, the minority leader of the House of Representatives, called Donald J. Trump shortly after the Nov. 8 election, they talked about domestic policy and infrastructure. But when Ms. Pelosi raised the specific subject of women’s issues, the president-elect did something unexpected: He handed the phone over to another person in the room — his 35-year-old daughter, Ivanka. Around the same time, Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook and the author of the best-selling women’s empowerment book “Lean In,” reached out to Ms. Trump, hoping to begin what aides from both sides described as “a dialogue.”

Anne-Marie Slaughter, a policy adviser to Hillary Clinton at the State Department and the author of “Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family,” had met Ms. Trump about a year ago at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Summit. She also sent word to the incoming first daughter a week after the election, saying that she hoped to be in touch with her after her father took office. “She is really serious about the ‘care agenda’ and can be a strong inside force,” Ms. Slaughter said in an interview. Perhaps most important, she said, “I don’t know anyone else.”

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