Home News Analysis World Bank decides to solve Karachi’s sewage problem

World Bank decides to solve Karachi’s sewage problem

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News Analysis |

The World Bank and Asian infrastructure investment bank (AIIB) have planned to mutually collaborate with Sindh government and Karachi water supply board to increase the operational capacity of KWSB. Following the inauguration of sewage water treatment plant in Mauripur on 22nd July, 2018, the world bank has decided to further assist Pakistan.

This project will be carried out to ensure that safe and reliable water services are supplied to the customers on sustainable and predictable basis in Karachi, and to solve the current sewage problems.The aim of this project is to help restore kwsb’s operations to provide financial stability and establish an enabling environment for future private sector investments in water supply and waste water treatment.

AIIB has approved the plan on the Karachi water and sewerage services improvement project’ for which the executive board will approve a loan amounting to $160 million.

One of the major concerns is to increase the output and productive capacity for the sewage system by constructing an infrastructure for the treatment of the Malir river basin i.e. a critical part of greater Karachi sewage project. AIIB has approved the plan on the Karachi water and sewerage services improvement project’ for which the executive board will approve a loan amounting to $160 million.

Read more: World Bank approves $825 million loan to Pakistan

This entire project will amount to $400 million in which the lead financier will be WB who will provide financial support of $160 million, AIIB of $160 million and Sindh government will contribute $80 million for the project.

Role of Key Stakeholders

The key stakeholders playing an important role in the success of the implementation of this project are Karachi water supply board (KWSB), AIIB, Sindh government and world bank.

KWSB

Over the years, kwsb has devised several plans regarding the functioning of existing treatment plants and setting up of new ones as well. Two major schemes have been contemplated to achieve the greater Karachi sewage treatment project (s-iii) and combined effluent treatment plants for industrial areas. However, these sewage plants have been lying non-functional.

Karachi produces more than 450 million gallons a day (mgd) of sewage. this includes liquid waste produced by households, businesses, hospitals and industrial units.

One in Shershah area near Lyari and the other at Mehmoodabad to the south of Shahrah-e-Faisal, both were constructed in 1964 and have been nonfunctional since 2013 and 2009 respectively. The third plant is located in western Karachi’s Mauripur area which was built in 1998 and that too has been nonfunctional since 2013.

Read more: World Bank backs out of arbitration on Indus Water Treaty: Implications…

Karachi produces more than 450 million gallons a day (MGD) of sewage. This includes liquid waste produced by households, businesses, hospitals and industrial units. passing through different drainage channels that empty out in the Lyari and Malir rivers as well as into various drains, all this refuse ends up in the sea. To avoid this dumping, the Malir river basin is being treated as one of the most critical parts of this improvement project.

AIIB

The Asian infrastructure investment bank (AIIB) had previously shown interests in extending financial assistance to launch four projects worth Rs.137.7 billion in Pakistan in September 2017. Sources indicate that these projects included, Karachi expressway (ring road), Karachi sewerage plan (s-iii), lining of kb feeder and Kandhkot-Ghouspur bridge on river Indus. As of now, it has been reported that AIIB will be investing $160 million, in this project.

Sindh Government

Muhammad Waseem, the chairman of planning and development department of Sindh board said that, “work on Rs 36.117 billion s-iii is in progress.” He said that as per national environmental quality standards (neqs) requirement, the industrial units are required to undertake pre-treatment of industrial effluent before discharging into municipal sewerage system.

in 2017, analysts reported that 94 mgd of industrial effluent was being generated from five industrial estates of Karachi and was being dumped directly into the open drain as municipal sewerage system.

Read more: World Bank concerned over the macroeconomic stability of Pakistan

The chief minister said that due to cost escalation of the s-iii, the provincial government required rs.28 billion to complete the project and that the establishment of five combined effluent treatment plants was necessary to meet the standards of world health organization. Therefore, to meet such demands, the Sindh government has decided to come up with $80 million for this project.

World Bank

In 2017 the world bank had previously granted Pakistan a loan amounting to $825 million to upgrade the energy and public finance sectors in a country to solve issues of chronic power shortages and poor fiscal management.

Previous events of generosity by the world bank displayed positive outcomes at the hands of a water supply project which was completed in 1998 with the assistance of wb, (k-ii 100 mgd). Showing their trust in Pakistani projects once again, wb decided to provide financial assistance amounting to $160 million. The world bank has already been playing a key role in the Indus waters treaty (iwt).

The role of arbitration of WB between India and Pakistan has been underway since April 2018 as well.

The government of Pakistan has asked the world bank for a meeting in Washington for talks on the country’s ongoing water dispute with India. this latest demand is an addition to the critical affair of water sharing in the Indo-Pak subcontinent, GVS earlier reported. The role of arbitration of WB between India and Pakistan has been underway since April 2018 as well.

What to Expect

Due to growing urbanization, Karachi’s infrastructure, basic municipal services such as water and sanitation, it is unable to meet the aggregate demand of the consumers in the provincial capital. There is a lack of sewage system to collect wastewater, which requires dire attention, as previous projects have either failed or have been excessively delayed in resulting positive outcomes.

Looking at the previous approaches of Pakistan to various aid providers, will kwse and Sindh government board effectively produce fruitful outcomes, and efficiently manage these funds? or will this tread lead to a massive disapproval by the investors.

Read more: Pakistan appeals to World Bank over Indian violation of Indus Water…

Karachi, over the years, has failed to efficiently address the city’s sewage problem, despite receiving funds from World Bank. Several sewage treatment plants are lying nonfunctional, and the rapidly growing population and unplanned construction has made the problem worse. It is only a matter of time until stakeholders start pulling out their funds. The newly elected government and cabinet of ministers  will face a lot of pressure in order to effectively implement such projects. considering the long hindered operations, will the responsible party solve Karachi’s sewage issue once and for all?

 


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