Home South Asia India World Bank doesn’t want Pakistan to pursue the Kishanganga Dam dispute

World Bank doesn’t want Pakistan to pursue the Kishanganga Dam dispute

The World Bank has asked Pakistan to withdraw its stand on referring the Kishanganga Dam dispute to the International Court of Arbitration (ICA) and accept India’s proposal on appointing ‘neutral experts’ to examine the issue.

dispute
  • 807
    Shares

News Analysis |
Pakistan will not beg for negotiations regarding Kishan Ganga Dams, warns FO

The spokesperson of Ministry of Foreign Affairs Dr Muhammad Faisal has said that the water dispute between India and Pakistan is a core issue as it is the ‘matter of life and death for Pakistan.’

During his weekly briefing to media, he said that Pakistan wants to resolve all the issues with India through dialogues but if India is not ready to sit on the negotiating table Pakistan will not beg. He said that World Bank is responsible for the construction of Kishan Ganga Dam.

“The polluted water can neither be used for the human consumption nor for washing purposes,” the report cautioned.

President Mamnoon Hussain would visit China on Saturday (9th June) to attend the summit conference Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO). During his visit, he would also meet Chinese counterpart to discuss bilateral relations.

The dispute of Kishanganga Dam

India has decided to construct a hydroelectric power plant on the Kishanganga River, which is a tributary of the Jhelum and is known as River Neelum in Pakistan. Last month Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi inaugurated the project barely meters away from the Line of Control.

Read more: Pakistan’s blue gold: A lurking fear

Kinshnaganga flows through the regions of Neelum in Azad Kashmir and Astore before entering the India-held region of Gurez. The dam will give India control over a river that flows originally from Pakistan into India-held Kashmir and then re-enters Pakistan.

Despite the 1960 Indus Waters Treaty, which gives Pakistan control over the waters of the Indus, Chenab and Jhelum Rivers, India has the audacity to construct a dam on the disputed region of Kashmir on the water on which Pakistan was granted control over.

A betrayal by the World Bank?

The World Bank has asked Pakistan to stand down from pursuing its stand of referring the Kishanganga Dam dispute to ICA and instead accept India’s offer of appointing a “neutral expert”.

India is decided to construct a hydroelectric power plant on the Kishanganga River, which is a tributary of the Jhelum and is known as River Neelum in Pakistan.

Not only the construction of the Kishan Ganga Dam would reduce water running into Pakistan and barren the crystal-like rivers of Neelum Valley, it would become a manipulative tool to use against Pakistan in politics and for exerting pressure in diplomacy.

The decision by World Bank comes as a surprise, an irresponsible ruling, considering that Pakistan is already threatened to be out of the water by 2025. A three-judge Supreme Court bench has taken up the issue and directed the federal government to furnish a comprehensive report on the reduced flow of the Neelum River because of the construction of the Kishanganga dam, which displays the prominent message that Pakistan would not be comprising on its water security.

Read more: “Water shortage is now the top priority of the court,” says…

Dr Faisal stated that the unprovoked firing online of control and other unethical measures are being taken by India.  He said that India is pushing the region into the lethal arms race, so Pakistan should be careful. Pakistan will not be pressurized or would fall under any influence by the statements of Indian leadership.  The armed forces of Pakistan are ready to meet every challenge.

The FO Spokesman said that during last one-week Indian army has martyred seven Kashmiris, as they were crushed by vehicles during a protest. The internet services are also closed in Srinagar. The FO stressed that waters of River Indus and its tributaries were a lifeline for more than 200 million people of Pakistan, it was not just water issue, but a human rights issue.

Environmentalists more concerned than World Bank

In 2013 local population of Bandipora protested against the construction company that was working on the Kishenganga hydroelectric project, accusing the project of causing severe damage to the natural environment and causing perilous pollution in the area. After protests by villagers in 2012 and 2013, tests were conducted in the area.

According to the results of the tests, pollution had caused a chemical disturbance in the water around the project site. High concentration of dissolved solids and unsafe alkaline levels in the water. “The polluted water can neither be used for the human consumption nor for washing purposes,” the report cautioned.


  • 807
    Shares

5 COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.