Home Life Style Food You don’t need anxiolytics when you can eat dark chocolate!

You don’t need anxiolytics when you can eat dark chocolate!

The higher the concentration of cacao, the more positive the impact on cognition, memory, mood, immunity and other beneficial effects.

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News Desk|

According to recent research findings, there might be health benefits to eating certain types of dark chocolate. Findings from two studies, being presented today at the Experimental Biology 2018 annual meeting in San Diego, show that consuming dark chocolate that has a high concentration of cacao (minimally 70% cacao, 30% organic cane sugar) has positive effects on stress levels, inflammation, mood, memory, and immunity.

Read more: 8 anti-aging food you need to know about

While it is well known that cacao is a major source of flavonoids, this is the first time the effect has been studied in human subjects to determine how it can support cognitive, endocrine and cardiovascular health.

These studies show us that the higher the concentration of cacao, the more positive the impact on cognition, memory, mood, immunity and other beneficial effects.

“For years, we have looked at the influence of dark chocolate on neurological functions from the standpoint of sugar content — the more sugar, the happier we are,” Berk said. “This is the first time that we have looked at the impact of large amounts of cacao in doses as small as a regular-sized chocolate bar in humans over short or long periods of time and are encouraged by the findings. These studies show us that the higher the concentration of cacao, the more positive the impact on cognition, memory, mood, immunity and other beneficial effects.”

The flavonoids found in cacao are extremely potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents, with known mechanisms beneficial for brain and cardiovascular health. The following results will be presented in live poster sessions during the Experimental Biology 2018 meeting:

Berk said the studies require further investigation, specifically to determine the significance of these effects for immune cells and the brain in larger study populations. Further research is in progress to elaborate on the mechanisms that may be involved in the cause-and-effect brain-behavior relationship with cacao at this high concentration.

Uncover the bittersweet story of this ancient treat
Etymologists trace the origin of the word “chocolate” to the Aztec word “xocoatl,” which referred to a bitter drink brewed from cacao beans. The Latin name for the cacao tree, Theobroma cacao, means “food of the gods.”

For several centuries in pre-modern Latin America, cacao beans were considered valuable enough to use as currency. One bean could be traded for a tamale, while 100 beans could purchase a good turkey hen, according to a 16th-century Aztec document.

Read more: Anxiety symptoms that many people overlook

By the 17th century, chocolate was a fashionable drink throughout Europe, believed to have nutritious, medicinal and even aphrodisiac properties (it’s rumored that Casanova was especially fond of the stuff).

By 1868, a little company called Cadbury was marketing boxes of chocolate candies in England. Milk chocolate hit the market a few years later, pioneered by another name that may ring a bell – Nestle.

Theobroma cacao, means “food of the gods.”

Dark chocolate can improve eyesight

Forget contacts and Lasik, researchers found that participants who consumed dark chocolate with 720 mg of cocoa flavanols experienced enhanced visual performance—like detecting motion and reading low contrast letters—likely due to the increased blood flow to the retina and brain.

Could Chocolate Actually Go Extinct In 40 Years?

An article from Erin Brodwin for the Business Insider blared the following headline, “Chocolate is on track to go extinct in 40 years.” Apparently, the concern is that cacao plants, which are the natural source of chocolate may go extinct by 2050. Well, cacao plants seem to be increasingly victims of fungal disease and climate change. Climate change may increase coastal flooding, worsen wildfires and hurricanes, foster the spread of insect-borne diseases, destroy coral reefs, threaten hundreds of animal species, and erode our current way of life, but jeopardize chocolate?

By 1868, a little company called Cadbury was marketing boxes of chocolate candies in England. Milk chocolate hit the market a few years later, pioneered by another name that may ring a bell – Nestle.

In fact, climate models predict that by the year 2050 a  2.1°C increase in temperatures and drier conditions will occur in these areas and may further shrink the possible growth areas. So, if you don’t want to run out of chocolate, turn off your air conditioners and plant more trees!


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