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All-new Toyota Tundra 2022 unveiled after 14 years of wait

After 14 years of waiting, the new 2022 Toyota Tundra takes a big leap forward with a hybrid powertrain, independent suspension, and the latest tech. The truck's design is pretty modern, with a large grille and headlights that live high up on the front.

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After 14 years of waiting, Toyota is finally going to let the world see its all-new next-gen Tundra full-size truck.

To make it a more competitive machine, the 2022 Toyota Tundra will feature multiple improvements over this year’s version, starting with a massive upgrade in technology and suspension hardware.

The first new Tundra since 2007 makes the full-size truck new again with an available hybrid powertrain, a multi-link rear suspension, 12,000 lb of towing capacity, and the latest in standard safety and convenience features. Toyota will sell it in SR, SR5, Limited, Platinum, 1794, and TRD Pro models, with select TRD packages, The Car Connection noted.

Overall, the 2022 Tundra is a little bit longer and not quite as tall as its predecessor. The truck’s design is pretty modern, with a large grille and headlights that live high up on the front fascia, surrounded by some shapely running lights. Depending on which trim one buys, the Tundra can be done up with lots of chrome or some oversized badges.

In the first look, it can be seen that on the rear end, the elongated tail lights can be seen with three different color elements. Other than that, not much has changed for the pickup truck.

The rear and front fenders have raised ridgelines, or shoulders, giving the pickup a blocky feel. The front, with a similarly ridged center hood and large grille, is bold and dominating.

The Tundra’s tailgate simply opens like normal, the only improvements being a 20% reduction in weight and the inclusion of a bump button on the side of the taillight that you can use when your hands are full, Cnet’s blog noted.

Tundra 2022 Rear
Source: MotorTrend

The company’s designers have called these new styling cues “technical muscle”, where the company wanted to show, “exemplification of toughness and capability”.

“We set out to create a muscular, chiseled, and an athletic design that also looks like it could handle the toughest towing demands,” said Kevin Hunter, president of Calty Design Research, the automaker’s U.S. design house, AP news reported.  

In order to improve the Tundra’s suspension, Toyota ditched the truck’s old leaf springs in favor of a multilink coil-spring setup in the rear. The Tundra can be had with an adaptive rear air suspension, which can adjust damping forces based on road conditions. The rear air setup has high, normal, and low modes, for easier bed loading and leveling while towing a trailer.

Read More: Top features of Toyota Camry 2022

Engine

On the power front, Tundra will offer two different powerplant configurations. A new, highly efficient twin-turbo 3.5-liter V6 engine offers impressive output by itself, producing up to 389 horsepower and 479 lb-ft. of torque.

Engine Tundra 2022
Source: Toyota

 

When paired with a brilliantly engineered bell-housing motor system called the i-FORCE MAX, the result is a combined performance output of 437 horsepower and a whopping 583 lb.-ft. of torque at only 2400 rpm. Both configurations will be mated to a new 10-speed automatic transmission.

The new 10-speed features a sequential shift mode, uphill/downhill shift logic, and TOW/HAUL driving modes, allowing the truck to pull up to 12,000 pounds.

One is designed for light loads like a small box trailer, while the Tow/Haul Plus feature amps up the throttle response for heavier items. Similarly, the payload is increased as well, up to a maximum of 1,940 pounds. That’s an 11% increase over the previous Tundra.

On the other hand, the hybrid option is available on Limited, Platinum, and 1794 trims, and allows for slow-speed all-electric cruising, in addition to providing more chutzpah when the accelerator is floored. Off-roaders and towing enthusiasts will probably enjoy all that torque, which comes on at a low 2,400 rpm.

Interior and infotainment

A new interior will offer creature comforts for driver and passenger alike, including an available panoramic roof, heated and ventilated front seats, rear sunshade, heated steering wheel, and more.

Tundra Interior 2022
Source: Motortrend

A host of new tech features are found throughout Tundra as well, such as towing aids, off-road enhancements, an all-new multimedia system featuring wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and over-the-air updates. Two different four-door layouts are available, as well as various bed lengths including a 5.5-foot bed, 6.5-footbed, and an 8.1-foot bed, AP news reported.

Safety

The press release by the company read, “Some truck manufacturers might require buyers to move up a few grades into the lineup before getting standard active safety – but not Toyota. Every Tundra will come standard with Toyota Safety Sense 2.5 on every single grade – that means from SR up to 1794 and TRD Pro.”

As for advanced driver’s aids, Toyota includes its Safety Sense 2.5 on every Tundra. This gives you features like pre-collision braking with pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control, lane-tracing assist, and lane-departure warning that now comes with a steering assist should you wander out of the lane. Also on tap are automatic high beams, rear-cross traffic alert, blind-spot monitoring, road sign assist, and a rear-seat reminder.

Read More: Honda aims to sell 70,000 Prologue EV in U.S. annually

Prices will be announced near the sale date at the end of the year. We can expect it to cost more than the $36,000 in the international market, the starting price of the outgoing model.

Note: All the features are for the international market, and no details are yet present for its launch in Pakistan.

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