Home Global Village Apple’s apologetic offer: iPhone batteries will now be cheaper

Apple’s apologetic offer: iPhone batteries will now be cheaper

apologetic

News Desk |

Apple has come under heavy fire from outbursts by consumers all around the world and being threatened with lawsuits, after it said it slowed older iPhones with flagging batteries. Apple is now cutting down prices for battery replacements and it will change its software to show users whether their phone battery is good.

In a posting on its website on Thursday the 28th of December, Apple apologized meekly over its handling of the battery issue and said it would make a number of changes for customers “to recognise their loyalty and to regain the trust of anyone who may have doubted Apple’s intentions.”

Shazam is also available on Android-based devices, but Apple did not say whether it would keep the Android version available.

Awkwardly enough, Apple made the move to address concerns about the quality and durability of its products at a time when it is charging a whopping $999 for its newest flagship model, the iPhone X. This havoc broke before the iPhone cult following could wipe out the memories of the catastrophic iPhone 8 unveiling (the iPhone 8’s trademark feature the face recognition unlock, had failed to operate on stage).

The company said it would cut the price of an out-of-warranty battery replacement from $79 to $29 for an iPhone 6 or later, starting next month. The company also will update its iOS operating system to let users see whether their battery is in poor health and is affecting the phone’s performance.

Read more: Apple admits to slowing down older iPhones!

“We know that some of you feel Apple has let you down,” Apple said in its posting. “We apologize.”

On December 20th, Apple acknowledged that iPhone software has the effect of slowing down some phones with battery problems. Apple said the problem was that aging lithium batteries delivered power unevenly, which could cause iPhones to shutdown unexpectedly to protect the delicate circuits inside.

Apple Music has 27 million users and competes against Spotify, which has 60 million users. Apple said Shazam’s team would be joining the Cupertino company.

That disclosure played on a common belief among consumers that Apple purposely slows down older phones to encourage customers to buy newer iPhone models. While no credible evidence has ever emerged that Apple engaged in such conduct, the battery disclosure struck a nerve on social media and elsewhere. Apple on Thursday denied that it has ever done anything to intentionally shorten the life of a product.

At least eight lawsuits have been filed in California, New York and Illinois alleging that the company defrauded users by slowing devices down without warning them. The company also faces a legal complaint in France, where so-called “planned obsolesce” is against the law.

Read more: Apple releases research on self-driving cars

Almost in a consolatory move to the disappointing chain of events, Apple has confirmed that it has acquired music engine, Shazam. Last week, Apple confirmed that it had reached a deal to acquire Shazam Entertainment, the UK-based app that lets users identify songs by pointing a smartphone at the audio source.

Apple said the problem was that aging lithium batteries delivered power unevenly, which could cause iPhones to shutdown unexpectedly to protect the delicate circuits inside.

Apple did not disclose a price for the acquisition. Technology news website and reviewer TechCrunch reported the deal on Friday with a price of as much as $400 million, far short of the most recent $1 billion valuation for the privately held Shazam.

Apple said Shazam would be a “natural fit” with its Apple Music streaming service and it would help users discover new songs. Apple Music has 27 million users and competes against Spotify, which has 60 million users. Apple said Shazam’s team would be joining the Cupertino company.

Read more: Apple’s iMessage Economy Is Already Big Business

In a statement, Apple spokesman Tom Neumayr said Shazam “is being used by hundreds of millions of people around the world, across multiple platforms. … We have exciting plans in store, and we look forward to combining with Shazam upon approval of today’s agreement.”

Apple did not do much elaboration on its plans, but the company will not be able to make any major changes to Shazam until it secures regulatory approval. Shazam is also available on Android-based devices, but Apple did not say whether it would keep the Android version available. Shazam ended support for a version of its software that runs on Microsoft’s Windows PCs earlier this year.


LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here