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China targets US arms producers with sanctions over $1.8bn deal

China opposes any weapon sales to Taiwan, which it considers to be under its sovereignty, saying these supplies destabilize the regional balance of power.

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China says it will impose sanctions on top US weapons manufacturers over a massive sale of their products to Taiwan. The Pentagon approved the deal last week, infuriating Beijing.

The US plans to deliver three weapon systems worth an estimated $1.8 billion to Taiwan. They include truck-based rocket launchers produced by Lockheed Martin, Boeing AGM-84H long-range air-to-ground missiles, and external sensor pods for F-16 jets, which are manufactured by a subsidiary of Raytheon Technologies, according to formal notifications received by the US Congress.

The three US defense giants will be sanctioned by the Chinese government if the deal goes through, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said at a news conference on Monday.

China opposes any weapon sales to Taiwan, which it considers to be under its sovereignty, saying these supplies destabilize the regional balance of power. As it ramps up tensions with China, the Trump administration has intensified diplomatic and trade cooperation with Taiwan, sending high-ranking officials to visit the island and offering lucrative trade contracts.

Read more: China pushing to double nuclear warhead arsenal, develop air-launched ballistic missiles: Pentagon

Here is a recap of the key issues surrounding the delicate relations between the US, China and Taiwan.

Leaves of the same tree

The deep rift between China and Taiwan dates back to China’s civil war, which erupted in 1927 and pitted forces aligned with the Communist Party of China against the Nationalist Kuomintang (KMT) army.

Eventually defeated by Mao Zedong’s Communists, KMT chief Chiang Kai-shek fled to Taiwan, which was still under KMT control.

Read more: China invades Taiwanese airspace briefly, sent back

From there, Chiang continued to claim the entirety of China — just as the mainland claimed Taiwan.

Taiwan’s official name remains the Republic of China, while the mainland is the People’s Republic of China.

For years both sides still formally claimed to represent all of China although that landscape has changed in recent decades.

Since the late 1990s, Taiwan has transformed from an autocracy into a vibrant democracy and a distinct Taiwanese identity has emerged.

The current ruling party, led by popular president Tsai Ing-wen, regards Taiwan as a de facto sovereign nation, not part of China.

The KMT, now in opposition, is more supportive of better ties with Beijing, especially on trade and maintains the idea that Taiwan is part of China.

The history behind the conflict

Washington cut formal diplomatic relations with Taiwan in 1979, switching recognition to Beijing as the sole representative of China, with the mainland becoming a major trading partner.

But the United States at the same time maintained a decisive, if at times delicate, role in supporting Taiwan.

Read more: Beijing should acknowledge Tiananmen says Taiwan

Under a law passed by Congress, the United States is required to sell Taiwan military supplies to ensure its self-defense against Beijing’s vastly larger armed forces.

In recent decades US presidents have been somewhat reluctant to sell big-ticket items to Taiwan, fearful of incurring Beijing’s wrath.

US President Donald Trump’s administration has no such qualms and has approved a string of military sales, including an $8 billion fighter jet deal to replace Taiwan’s ageing fleet.

Both China and Taiwan pledged there is “one China”

In 1992, Taiwan and mainland China both pledged there is only “one China” but they agreed to disagree about what that precisely meant.

Only 14 nations, all in the developing world, and the Vatican still recognize Taiwan.

Beijing has tried hard to stop any international recognition for the island.

The United States, while recognizing Beijing, is deliberately careful in its wording.

The United States says only that it “acknowledges” Beijing’s claim to Taiwan — and leaves it for the two sides to work out a solution while opposing any use of force to change the status quo.

In practice, Taiwan enjoys many of the trappings of a full diplomatic relations with the United States.

Read more: Taiwan’s top military chief killed in chopper crash

While there is no US embassy in Taipei, Washington runs a center called the American Institute in Taiwan. In the United States, the island’s diplomats enjoy the status of other nations’ personnel.

Beijing is sensitive to any move that could amount to official recognition of Taiwan, such as when Tsai spoke by telephone to Trump after his election but before his inauguration.

The United States has pushed for Taiwan to be included in UN bodies such as the World Health Organization.

Read more: China condemns US for congratulating Tsai on Taiwan poll win

RT with additional input by GVS News Desk

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