Hajj 2020: Saudi Arabia may delay hajj plans over coronavirus epidemic

Saudi Arabia is taking strict measures to control further spread of the coronavirus in the Kingdom. The pilgrimage is a great source of revenue generation for the kingdom and its suspension this year may cause the Saudi economy to suffer potential losses. With applications submitted by pious Muslims all over the world for the pilgrimage, let's see how the Saudi Govt handles the situation.

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Saudi Arabia’s hajj minister asked Muslims on Tuesday to temporarily defer preparations for the annual pilgrimage amid uncertainty over the coronavirus pandemic.

Earlier this month, Saudi Arabia suspended the year-round “umrah” pilgrimage over fears of the new coronavirus spreading to Islam’s holiest cities, an unprecedented move that raised uncertainty over the annual hajj.

“Saudi Arabia is fully ready to serve pilgrims and umrah seekers,” hajj minister Mohammad Benten told the state-run Al-Ekhbariya television.

“But under the current circumstances, as we are talking about the global pandemic… the kingdom is keen to protect the health of Muslims and citizens and so we have asked our brother Muslims in all countries to wait before doing (hajj) contracts until the situation is clear.”

Saudi authorities are yet to announce whether they will proceed with this year’s hajj, scheduled for the end of July.

The Hajj, sometimes spelled Haj, is the annual pilgrimage to Mecca that Muslims are expected to make at least once in their lifetime. The word Hajj is an Arabic word, meaning ‘to intend a journey’.

Hajj is the fifth pillar of Islam – the others are shahadah (declaration of faith); salat (daily prayer); zakat (giving of alms); sawm (fasting in Ramadan).

It is mandatory for Muslim adults to go on Hajj at least once in their lifetime. They must be of sound mind and physically and financially capable of undertaking the journey.

Those who complete the pilgrimage can add the title Hajji to their names.

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The pilgrimage — which last year attracted 2.5 million people — is a key revenue earner for the kingdom. But it could be a major source of contagion as it packs pilgrims closely in religious sites.

Earlier this month, Saudi Arabia suspended prayers inside all its mosques except the two holiest sites in Islam as it increased efforts to contain the new coronavirus.

The announcements risk riling fringe Muslim hardliners, for whom religion trumps health considerations.

Saudi Arabia is scrambling to limit the spread of the disease at home. The kingdom’s health ministry has reported 1,563 coronavirus infections and 10 deaths from the illness so far.

AFP with additional input from GVS News Desk.

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