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Thursday, July 18, 2024

Life-size sculpture of Maharaja Ranjit Singh displayed at Lahore Fort

News Desk |

A life-sized sculpture of Sikh ruler Maharaja Ranjit Singh was unveiled outside the Sikh Gallery at Lahore Fort to commemorate his 180th death anniversary on Thursday, 27th June. The sculpture is one of its kind in the Indo-Pak and took a total of eight months to complete under the supervision of Faqir Khana Museum Director, Faqir Saifuddin.

“The sculpture is beautiful and very realistic, with all characteristics of Maharaja Ranjit Singh,” the creator of the sculpture told a local media outlet. “This sculpture is a tribute and homage to the son of the soil,” he added.

The sculpture shows Maharaja Singh riding his favourite Arabic horse, Kahar Bahar, a gift from Dost Muhammad Khan, the founder of the Barakzai Dynasty.

The sculpture shows Maharaja Singh riding his favourite Arabic horse, Kahar Bahar, a gift from Dost Muhammad Khan, the founder of the Barakzai Dynasty. “The sculpture is finished in fibre cold bronze material and matchless in its making when compared to other statues of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in this region,” said Faqir.

Faqir Saifuddin shared some intriguing details pertaining to Maharaja Ranjit Singh, explaining how Singh never ordered a capital punishment throughout his 39-years of reign in Punjab. “There were no communal riots and no forced conversions in his era. He remained a wall of iron against the British army for decades,” he added.

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“It’s a moment of great pride that, being a Punjabi, I am part of this history. It’s important to me because three members of my family, Fakir Nooruddin, Fakir Azizuddin, and Fakir Imamuddin, were all emissaries to Ranjit Singh,” he said.

“Lahore has rich cultural and religious diversity since centuries. Ranjit was one important part of it. It is part of history which the citizens of Lahore witnessed, 70-year looting of the Afghan rulers. They found relief in the 19-year-old Ranjit Singh upon the pre-condition of not to loot them and protecting their religious rights.”

“The letter was written in 1799 to Ranjit Singh duly signed by 13 senior citizens of Lahore. Out of 13, two were non-Muslims, including Hakim Hakim Raye and Guru Ranjit Singh. He entered Lahore in June of 1799 with the help of his mother-in-law and her forces, fighting against the Bhangi Sikhs and defeated them in four days,” he concluded.

A man of his stature and influence, it is the perfect homage to Maharaja Ranjit Singh.