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Remembering the tragic shift in Kashmir in 2014

According to Mustafa Khan, we have words of what the new masters of Kashmir have learned to apply what the new ideology is. “Wars ceased to become effective instruments to achieve political and military objectives. They are too expensive, unaffordable and there’s uncertainty about the outcome. It is the civil society that can be subverted, divided and manipulated to hurt the interest of the nation.

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AS Dulat in his book Kashmir: The Vajpayee Years admits “Kashmir has been a huge education,” but few could educate their masters in New Delhi to adopt a conciliatory rather than confrontation attitude. People from outside the valley in particular and Jammu and Kashmir as well learn different things as their perspective on that Muslim-dominated region. Dulat himself left the government sooner after Modi came to power in 2014. He called on former PM Vajpayee and asked him “Sir, yeh kya ho gaya?” Vajpayee: “Yeh unko bhi nahee maloom ki kya ho gaya.

At the surprise win of Modi, both Vajpayee and Dulat were aghast at the development. No sooner had Vajpayee expressed surprise than he also admitted synchronizing surprise with realizing the mistake of the past. “Woh hamare se gaoti hui.” Dulat says that “he lost power because he did not stop the 2002 riots.” Dulat left office on May 31 2014 and soon MK Narayanan succeeded him. Dulat looked at him in surprise: “this gang brought me here with them so I thought I should go with them.” Ultimately, the approach to Kashmir ended there and then. And since then, there has been no attempt because the duo Modi and Amit Shah had another kind of agenda.

Read more: Reckoning the destiny of Narendra Modi

Inviting Europeans for their view on Kashmir

As of now, there will never be any repeat of what went before. Instead, we have words of what the new masters of Kashmir have learned to apply what the new ideology is. “Wars ceased to become effective instruments to achieve political and military objectives. They are too expensive, unaffordable and there’s uncertainty about the outcome. It is the civil society that can be subverted, divided and manipulated to hurt the interest of the nation. You are there to see that this land is fully protected,” Ajit Kumar Doval told the graduating cops at Hyderabad. He like his master wants to focus on civil society in the mainland and also in the valley to control.

“No nation can be built where the rule of law has failed.” The new frontier of war is the civil society which can be manipulated to hurt a nation’s interests, said National Security Advisor Ajit Doval. So great change that the society was undergoing was left in darkness and terror.

“All the curtains were drawn in the evening time and the lights were kept switched off even in the darkness. All this was just to give the impression that we were asleep.  We could hardly sleep in the atmosphere of terror. The most we were able to do was to pretend to be asleep.” Another change was the loss of smiling. This changed perception is recorded by BBC reporter Nayeema Mahjoor in her book Lost in Terror.

Even more tragic events followed when Modi and Shah turned the screw including “Throw stones at the mosque like you throw stones at us,” told the police to Kashmiri youths.

Read more: Redeeming from destiny: India, Pakistan and Bangladesh

Civil society was now targeted

“The SP saheb (superintendent of police) beat me the night I was dragged to the police station,” he told me. “There were other boys in the van. When I told them I studied in class eight in school and knew nothing about the protests, they would start beating me again.”

The Ahmed brothers were beaten for two hours before they were taken to the central jail. Muzaffar told me that once there, they were beaten for hours with a bamboo stick. When they went unconscious, they were woken up with electric shocks. He shows me his burnt skin. The two brothers were held for 20 days. After they were released, Shabbir put them in a tempo and hurried them to a hospital in Srinagar. The doctor told him that his son barely survived with his spine. Muzaffar, who prayed five times a day in the local mosque, broke down: “They have broken my bones; I cannot prostrate myself before Allah.”

AS Dulat in his book Kashmir: the Vajpayee Years admits “Kashmir has been a huge education,” but few could educate their masters in New Delhi to adopt a conciliatory rather than confrontation attitude. People from outside the valley in particular and Jammu and Kashmir as well learn different things as their perspective on that Muslim-dominated region. Dulat himself left the government sooner after Modi came to power in 2014. He called on former PM Vajpayee and asked him “Sir, yeh kya ho gaya?” Vajpayee: “Yeh unko bhi nahee maloom ki kya ho gaya. At the surprise win of Modi, both Vajpayee and Dulat were aghast at the development.

No sooner had Vajpayee expressed surprise than he also admitted synchronizing surprise with realizing the mistake of the past. “Woh hamare se gaoti hui.” Dulat says that “he lost power because he did not stop the 2002 riots.” Dulat left office on May 31 2014 and soon MK Narayanan succeeded him. Dulat looked at him in surprise: “this gang brought me here with them so I thought I should go with them.” Ultimately, the approach to Kashmir ended there and then. And since then, there has been no attempt because the duo Modi and Amit Shah had another kind of agenda. They invited Europeans for their view on Kashmir.

Read more: Worsening and insecure life of Muslims in India

Everything ended in a tailspin

Instead, we have words of what the new masters of Kashmir have learned to apply what the new ideology is. “Wars ceased to become effective instruments to achieve political and military objectives. They are too expensive, unaffordable and there’s uncertainty about the outcome. It is the civil society that can be subverted, divided and manipulated to hurt the interest of the nation. You are there to see that this land is fully protected,” Ajit Kumar Doval told the graduating cops at Hyderabad. He like his master wants to focus on civil society in the mainland and also in the valley to control.

 “No nation can be built where the rule of law has failed.” The new frontier of war is the civil society which can be manipulated to hurt a nation’s interests, said National Security Advisor Ajit Doval. So great change that the society was undergoing was left in darkness and terror. Civil society was now targeted.

“All the curtains were drawn in the evening time and the lights were kept switched off even in the darkness. All this was just to give the impression that we were asleep.  We could hardly sleep in the atmosphere of terror. The most we were able to do was to pretend to be asleep.” Another change was the loss of smiling. This changed perception is recorded by BBC reporter Nayeema Mahjoor in her book Lost in Terror.

Even more tragic events followed when Modi and Shah turned the screw including “Throw stones at the mosque like you throw stones at us,” told the police to Kashmiri youths.

“The SP saheb (superintendent of police) beat me the night I was dragged to the police station,” he told me. “There were other boys in the van. When I told them I studied in class eight in school and knew nothing about the protests, they would start beating me again.”

Read more: Tragic realization: Delhi, Gujarat and Kashmir

The Ahmed brothers were beaten for two hours before they were taken to the central jail. Muzaffar told me that once there, they were beaten for hours with a bamboo stick. When they went unconscious, they were woken up with electric shocks. He shows me his burnt skin. The two brothers were held for 20 days. After they were released, Shabbir put them in a tempo and hurried them to a hospital in Srinagar. The doctor told him that his son barely survived with his spine. Muzaffar, who prayed five times a day in the local mosque, broke down: “They have broken my bones; I cannot prostrate myself before Allah.”

Muzaffar’s mother invited me inside the house. She asked whether I can protect her daughter-in-law. “They were drunk, and they kept asking for my daughter-in-law,” she said of the officers. “I fear they will come again.”

 

 

Mustafa Khan holds a Ph.D. on Mark Twain. He lives in Malegaon Maharashtra, India. The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Global Village Space.