decades
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Zeeshan Munir |

August 14, 2017, marked the 70th independence anniversary of Pakistan. The seven decades of its existence can be compared to a roller-coaster ride. The country is considered to be an epitome of unpredictability, political instability, coups and internal division. However, this 70th Independence anniversary is also a reminder of the fact that this country is breathing and thus is very much alive. Although this country is engulfed by a few hydra-headed problems its resilience has been a prominent feature of these seven decades of survival.

It is the need of the hour to indulge future generation in the nation-building process otherwise they would prove to a burden on the already fragile country

Along with the celebrations, we should take a trip down the memory lane to have an analysis of our past. This would help us in understanding the role of our past and how it has shaped not just our present but future as well. Like tidal waves, we have witnessed our highs and lows. There have been certain instances where we achieved something substantial and on the other hand, there have been instances where we touched the nadir but still, we survived.

Read more: Malala: Why so many in Pakistan hate what she symbolises?

Pakistan has been continuously labeled as a failed state, in fact, some have been calling it a rogue state. Therefore its survival amidst all the speculations is by far its biggest success. People still believe that the creation of Pakistan is a miracle, however, in reality, its survival is even a bigger miracle.  Despite fighting with various issues such as fall of Dhaka, political instability, terrorism and arch rivalry with India it is still moving on. This speaks volumes about our resilience and grit.

Since day one, circumstances were not favorable for the nascent country. Pakistan in its early years came across refugee problem, administrative problems and differences regarding the division of assets. Its survival was questioned by every sane man.

The energy of youth must be channelized in the right direction. Similarly, joblessness should be addressed in order to provide job opportunities to this youth

History depicts that Radcliffe award was critical in sewing the seed of animosity among numerous communities and hence led to a bloody and violent partition. In addition to this, the indecisiveness of the then Viceroy Mountbatten was an instigator in cementing the rift between the newly independent states. Kashmir is still the bone of contention between two nuclear states and it is like a tinder-box which has already driven these states to wars.  This has thus been a true test of our survival.

Read more: Pakistan buries Dr. Ruth Pfau with State Funeral

Moreover, this story of incredible survival also shows that unfortunately, we are a nation that does not believe in long-term decision-making, in fact, we like to take steps at the eleventh hour. Our performances on the cricket field and our handling of natural calamities are a testimony to this fact.

However, the worst part of the story is the way we are surviving. We are actually seventy years old now but democracy is still in its embryonic stages. Intolerance and extreme polarization on the basis of religion, province, race, and ethnicity is a norm in our country.

Young blood is the future of Pakistan therefore ‘brain drain’ must be checked. Certain tangible steps should be taken to check ‘brain drain’

Instead of embracing the beauty of diversity with open arms we have actually turned this diversity as a threat to our survival. Our preoccupation with multiple identities overshadows our nationality consequently promoting apprehension and suspicion. Politics of fear has dominated our political spectrum and as a result of this, we talk in terms of conspiracy theories.

Back in the 60s and the 70s religious card was used to legitimize power. This religious card has proved to be a catalyst in dividing the pluralistic state and as a result of Pakistan never proved to be a melting pot for its inhabitants. Apart from military no institution has been developed and political instability led to fragmentation of the country in the name of religion, sect, and ethnicity.

Fall of Dhaka didn’t happen overnight rather it was the result of this intolerance towards accepting and celebrating diversity. We were ourselves responsible for this mercurial situation and provided India with an opportunity to exploit this situation.

Read more: Pakistan at 70

Democracy must be given a chance for a better Pakistan. Pakistan is blessed with infinite resources and CPEC is a major project which is a ray of hope in these gloomy circumstances

They say “every dark cloud has a silver lining” so one should never lose hope.  Despite all the difficulties I still believe Pakistan has what it takes to survive another seven decades.  Political stability is going to play a pivotal role in the development of our country.

Democracy must be given a chance for a better Pakistan. Pakistan is blessed with infinite resources and CPEC is a major project which is a ray of hope in these gloomy circumstances. Our ‘youth bulge’ is our most reliable asset. Youth is contributing in all fields in general and mass media in particular.  This young blood is the future of Pakistan therefore ‘brain drain’ must be checked. Certain tangible steps should be taken to check ‘brain drain’.

The energy of youth must be channelized in the right direction. Similarly, joblessness should be addressed in order to provide job opportunities to this youth. Moreover, quality education is an inalienable right of everyone so this should be ensured. It is the need of the hour to indulge future generation in the nation-building process otherwise they would prove to a burden on the already fragile country.

Zeeshan Munir is a Research Analyst and Sub-Editor at Global Village Space. He has a penchant for writing on the Middle East and International Humanitarian Law. The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Global Village Space’s editorial policy.

Zeeshan Munir is a Research Analyst and Sub Editor at Global Village Space. He has a penchant for writing on the Middle East and International Humanitarian Law.

Comments & Discussion